Gladys Adenture

Gladys Adventure
Mt Kilimanjaro Treks

Dominating the landscape like no other mountain - Mt Kilimanjaro is the highest peak in Africa and the highest free-standing mountain in the world at 5895 metres. It is also the highest mountain that can be climbed without technical gear and techniques.

A trek up to the top of Kilimanjaro has proved to be one of the most rewarding and incredible experiences that our guests have experienced. Time after time, their comments upon their return are filled with a combination of awe, exhaustion, wonder and delight! Our climbers also are so pleased with our crew of guides and porters and how helpful and spirited they are, and our cooks that create a bounty of fresh, tasty meals that fuel your body for your extreme exertion. We can handle most special menu requests (vegetarian, vegan, gluten free, food allergies, etc.). Our guides are trained in high levels of first aid and will be monitoring you all the way up the mountain, checking your oxygen levels, pulse and blood pressure a couple times daily. They carry emergency oxygen if anyone should need it. Our overall success rate of reaching the summit with Gladys Adventure guides is 98%! Our guides and mountain crew are awesome at helping motivate people and encouraging them to summit. Everyone tells us that they would have either not made it or would have had a MUCH harder time without them and their positive spirit and singing!

Gladys Adventure is a proud partner with the Kilimanjaro Porters Assistance Project (KPAP), a local non-profit organization that is dedicated to the fair treatment of porters and crew on Kilimanjaro. KPAP is the local initiative of the International Mountain Explorers Connection (IMEC) and performs the monitoring activities for IMEC's Partner for Responsible Travel Program. We gladly follow strict standards in more than 10 areas of treatment criteria to assure that we are responsible, fair and have good treatment practices towards our mountain crew. Because of our partnership with KPAP, you can rest assured that you are choosing a company that can make you confident you are making an honorable choice by being a part of the commitment to a humanitarian cause. Please ask us about this and we will be more than happy to share additional information about this prestigious partnership!

One of the secrets to our success is the fact that we only use our handpicked, highly trained and highly knowledgable guides, assistant guides, chefs and porters. Not wanting to hire just any contractor assures you, the climber, a safe, comfortable and memorable accent. Especially if you are a solo climber or a twosome and would like to join a group please refer to our scheduled climbs by clicking Join a Group. Of course with any number of participants you are also welcome to book a private climb.

Route Choices

There are a few route choices to climb Kilimanjaro. The standard itineraries range from 5 days to 9 days. Of the routes, Marangu route is different from the others in that the overnights are spent in dormitory style huts with solar power. All other routes are camping routes. It is the least expensive route and the shortest route. It is not as scenic as the other routes though and does not offer very good acclimatization since it is a short climb. It is the only route where the ascent and descent follow the same path. The most popular routes are Machame route and Lemosho route. A few short years ago Lemosho was known as a little used route, now it is our most requested route. Both these routes offer great acclimatization and are scenic. Umbwe route is the most difficult route and does not offer very good acclimatization but is sought after by some experienced climbers as the biggest challenge. It is not recommended for the average climber. Rongai route is a lesser used route but quite scenic. Many people think of it as the easiest route on the mountain. It is a good route choice during wet months (March, April, May, November) since the north side of the mountain does not receive as much precipitation. Grand Traverse route is not yet an official route but an excellent choice for a climb. It is scenic, is very sparcely used (we expect this to change within a few years), and offers very good acclimatization. The Mweka route is used for descent only. It is used by Machame, Lemosho, Umbwe and Grand Traverse for the descent. Rongai and Marangu routes descend along the Marangu route (note that although huts are present on the Marangu route, those descending from the Rongai route will still have overnights in tents.)

Gladys Adventure Mt Kilimanjaro Route Map Click on any of the route names below to read the itineraries.

This is also known as the Northern Circuit or Alternative Lemosho Route. It is offered by some tour companies (such as ours) but not yet an official route. This route starts on the western side of the mountain then winds around the north side before ascending up to Uhuru Peak from the east. The descent is down the Mweka Route. We look for this route to become increasingly popular with good opportunity for acclimatization and quite scenic. Right now this route is not crowded at all.

Day 1 – Londorossi Gate (2,100 meters) – start point 2,360 meters to Mti Mkubwa Camp (2,820 meters)
Distance: ~5.5km / 3 miles
Trekking time: 3-4 hours
Zone: Rainforest
The Grand Traverse Route begins at Londorossi Gate (2,100 meters) in the West, the same start point as the Lemosho Route. The drive to Londorossi Gate takes approximately two hours from Moshi. Registration with the Kilimanjaro National Park authorities occurs at the gate and then you will be driven further up the mountain to the trailhead starting point. You may get lucky and spot large wildlife like elephant and buffalo that sometimes emerge from the rainforest onto the path as you trek towards your first camp. Dinner will be served when you reach Mti Mkubwa Camp.

Day 2 – Mti Mkubwa Camp (2,820 meters) to Shira Camp 1 (3,610 meters)
Distance: ~8km / 5 miles
Trekking time: 5-6 hours
Zone: Rainforest / Low Alpine Zone
On day two you will spend the first hour trekking through the last section of rainforest path before entering the low alpine moorland zone which follows up onto the Shira Plateau. The trek is relatively short and gradual, ending at Shira Camp 1 (3,610 meters).

Day 3 – Shira Camp 1 (3,610 meters) to Moir Camp (4,200 meters)
Distance: ~7km / 4 miles
Trekking time: 3-4 hours
Zone: Rainforest / Low Alpine Zone
On day three the trek crosses the Shira Plateau from Shira Camp 1 to Shira Camp 2. We will continue east up the Shira Plateau ridge and on to Lava Tower (4,600 meters) and then back down to Moir Camp (4,200 meters).

Day 4 – Moir Camp (4,200 meters) to Pofu Camp (4,020 meters)
Distance: ~12km / 7 miles
Trekking time: 5-7 hours
Zone: High alpine zone
Day four involves a moderately steep climb out of Moir Valley. Trekkers can take a small detour here to climb the summit of Little Lent Hill at 4,375 meters before returning to the Grand Traverse trail. From here the route follows a series of inclines and declines, skirting around the northern slopes of Kibo to Pofu (Buffalo) Camp (4,020 meters).The trek gives great vistas out across the plains that lie north of Kilimanjaro and stretch out to the Kenyan / Tanzanian border. You will arrive at Pofu Camp just after midday, where you will have lunch and have time to rest after a long day hiking.

Day 5 – Pofu Camp (4,020 meters) to Rongai Third Cave (3,800 meters)
Distance: ~8km / 5 miles
Trekking time: 5-7 hours
Zone: High alpine zone and low alpine zone
Day five starts with a climb up the Buffalo ridge and then continues east along the northern slopes to the Rongai Third Cave at 3,800 meters. The trek is shorter than the day before and by now you should be feeling well acclimatised to the altitude. You will arrive at the Third Cave just around mid-afternoon.

Day 6 – Third Cave (3,800 meters) to School Hut (4,800 meters) or Kibo Hut
Distance: ~15km / 8 miles
Trekking time: 4-5 hours
Zone: High alpine zone and glacial zone
Day six involves a steady incline up and over the Saddle which sits between the peaks of Kibo and Mawenzi Peak. Trekkers then continue walking south-west up to School Hut (4,800 meters). After arriving at School Hut you will be served an early dinner and then you should get some sleep as you will be awoken before midnight to start your summit attempt. Remember to prepare all your gear, including warm clothes, insulated water bottles, snacks, headlamp and camera before going to bed.

Day 7 – School Hut (4,800 meters) to Uhuru Peak (5,895 meters) and then onto Millennium Camp (3,950 meters)
Distance: ~6km / 3.5 miles ascent and 10.5km / 6 mile descent
Trekking time: 6-8 hours ascent and then 4-6 hour descent
Zone: Glacial zone and all preceding zones
You will be awoken at midnight with hot tea and biscuits and will then begin the steep incline up the slopes of Kibo under the cover of darkness. Your first check-point is Hans Meyer Cave where you will take a short break. The climb steepens as you approach Gilman’s Point (5,681 meters), which will be around 5-6 hours after departing School Hut. Take a moment to enjoy the approaching dawn and incredible view out and across to Mawenzi Peak. From here you gather all your energy and every bit of determination to reach Uhuru Peak (5895 meters). How long you stay at the summit will depend on the timing, the weather and your physical condition. You will then head around the crater rim to Stella Point (5,739 meters) where you will turn south and head down the heavily screed slopes of Kibo to Barafu Camp (4,680 meters). Most trekkers take a short break here before continuing down to Millennium Camp (3,950 meters) for your final night on the mountain. In total you will be trekking for 14-16 hours on day eight so it is important to pace yourself, remain hydrated and keep your blood sugar levels up.

Day 8 – Millennium Camp (3,950 meters) to Mweka Gate (1,640 meters)
Distance: ~10km / 6.5 miles
Trekking time: 3-4 hours
Zone: Rainforest zone
The final day is a short hike through the dense montane rainforest from Millennium Camp (3,950 meters) to Mweka Gate (1,640 meters). At the gate you will need to sign-out with the authorities, who will also provide you with your official certificate – a green certificate for those who made it to Gilman’s Point and a gold certificate for those who reached Uhuru Peak.

This is also known as the Northern Circuit or Alternative Lemosho Route. It is offered by some tour companies (such as ours) but not yet an official route. This route starts on the western side of the mountain then winds around the north side before ascending up to Uhuru Peak from the east. The descent is down the Mweka Route. We look for this route to become increasingly popular with good opportunity for acclimatization and quite scenic. Right now this route is not crowded at all. This route is also offered as an 8 day climb but our guides tell us that 9 days is ideal.

Day 1 – Londorossi Gate (2,100 meters) – start point 2,360 meters to Mti Mkubwa Camp (2,820 meters)
Distance: ~5.5km / 3 miles
Trekking time: 3-4 hours
Zone: Rainforest
The Grand Traverse Route begins at Londorossi Gate (2,100 meters) in the West, the same start point as the Lemosho Route. The drive to Londorossi Gate takes approximately two hours from Moshi. Registration with the Kilimanjaro National Park authorities occurs at the gate and then you will be driven further up the mountain to the trailhead starting point. You may get lucky and spot large wildlife like elephant and buffalo that sometimes emerge from the rainforest onto the path as you trek towards your first camp. Dinner will be served when you reach Mti Mkubwa Camp.

Day 2 – Mti Mkubwa Camp (2,820 meters) to Shira Camp 1 (3,610 meters)
Distance: ~8km / 5 miles
Trekking time: 5-6 hours
Zone: Rainforest / Low Alpine Zone
On day two you will spend the first hour trekking through the last section of rainforest path before entering the low alpine moorland zone which follows up onto the Shira Plateau. The trek is relatively short and gradual, ending at Shira Camp 1 (3,610 meters).

Day 3 – Shira Camp 1 (3,610 meters) to Shira Camp 2 (3,850 meters)
Distance: ~7km / 4 miles
Trekking time: 3-4 hours
Zone: Rainforest / Low Alpine Zone
On day three the trek crosses the Shira Plateau from Shira Camp 1 to Shira Camp 2. At Shira Camp 2 it is worth trekking a little higher up the plateau to enjoy the stunning view across the valley below and Western Breach of Kilimanjaro above. The plateau is exposed so be prepared for a cold night with temperatures getting below freezing.

Day 4 – Shira Camp 2 (3,850 meters) to Lava Tower (4,600 meters) and then north to Moir Camp (4,200 meters)
Distance: ~14km / 8 miles
Trekking time: 5-7 hours
Zone: Low alpine zone / High alpine zone
Day four is a long trek heading east which passes through the ‘Garden of the Senecios’ and then enters the high alpine desert zone. The morning is spent trekking up to Lava Tower and the iconic Shark’s Tooth rock formation at 4,600 meters, where you will have lunch. After lunch you will join the northern circuit heading down to Moir Camp at 4,200 meters. This is an important day in your trek as you will get to experience high altitude and then sleep low, which is good for the acclimatisation process.

Day 5 – Moir Camp (4,200 meters) to Pofu Camp (4,020 meters)
Distance: ~12km / 7 miles
Trekking time: 5-7 hours
Zone: High alpine zone
Day five involves a moderately steep climb out of Moir Valley. Trekkers can take a small detour here to climb the summit of Little Lent Hill at 4,375 meters before returning to the Grand Traverse trail. From here the route follows a series of inclines and declines, skirting around the northern slopes of Kibo to Pofu (Buffalo) Camp (4,020 meters).The trek gives great vistas out across the plains that lie north of Kilimanjaro and stretch out to the Kenyan / Tanzanian border. You will arrive at Pofu Camp just after midday, where you will have lunch and have time to rest after a long day hiking.

Day 6 – Pofu Camp (4,020 meters) to Rongai Third Cave (3,800 meters)
Distance: ~8km / 5 miles
Trekking time: 5-7 hours
Zone: High alpine zone and low alpine zone
Day six starts with a climb up the Buffalo Ridge and then continues east along the northern slopes to the Rongai Third Cave at 3,800 meters. The trek is shorter than the day before and by now you should be feeling well acclimatised to the altitude. You will arrive at the Third Cave just around mid-afternoon.

Day 7 – Third Cave (3,800 meters) to School Hut (4,800 meters) or Kibo Hut
Distance: ~15km / 8 miles
Trekking time: 4-5 hours
Zone: High alpine zone and glacial zone
Day seven involves a steady incline up and over the Saddle which sits between the peaks of Kibo and Mawenzi Peak. Trekkers then continue walking south-west up to School Hut (4,800 meters). After arriving at School Hut you will be served an early dinner and then you should get some sleep as you will be awoken before midnight to start your summit attempt. Remember to prepare all your gear, including warm clothes, insulated water bottles, snacks, headlamp and camera before going to bed.

Day 8 – School Hut (4,800 meters) through the crater to Uhuru Peak (5,895 meters) and then onto Millennium Camp (3,950 meters)
Distance: ~6km / 3.5 miles ascent and 10.5km / 6 mile descent
Trekking time: 6-8 hours ascent and then 4-6 hour descent
Zone: Glacial zone and all preceding zones
You will be awoken at midnight with hot tea and biscuits and will then begin the steep incline up the slopes of Kibo under the cover of darkness. Your first check-point is Hans Meyer Cave where you will take a short break. The climb steepens as you approach Gilman’s Point (5,681 meters), which will be around 5-6 hours after departing School Hut. Take a moment to enjoy the approaching dawn and incredible view out and across to Mawenzi Peak. From here, you descend into the crater. It is common to feel the effects of the altitude inside of the crater but you will feel a boost in fitness as you ascend up to reach Uhuru Peak. Your stay here will be brief so get as many pictures as you can of the incredible views and surrounding glaciers. You will then head down back around the crater rim to Stella Point (5,739 meters) where you will turn south and head down the heavily screed slopes of Kibo to Barafu Camp (4,680 meters). Most trekkers take a short break here before continuing down to Millennium Camp (3,950 meters) for your final night on the mountain. In total you will be trekking for 14-16 hours on day eight so it is important to pace yourself, remain hydrated and keep your blood sugar levels up.

Day 9 – Millennium Camp (3,950 meters) to Mweka Gate (1,640 meters)
Distance: ~10km / 6.5 miles
Trekking time: 3-4 hours
Zone: Rainforest zone
The final day is a short hike through the dense montane rainforest from Millennium Camp (3,950 meters) to Mweka Gate (1,640 meters). At the gate you will need to sign-out with the authorities, who will also provide you with your official certificate – a green certificate for those who made it to Gilman’s Point and a gold certificate for those who reached Uhuru Peak. From here you will be driven back to Moshi where you can get a good hot shower say farewell to your staff, give out tips and celebrate!

Day 1: Hotel - Londorossi Gate (2360m) - Mti Mkubwa Camp (2810m)
Your day starts early with a breakfast from the hotel, followed by a 2-hour drive from the hotel (910m) to Londorossi Park Gate (2100m). The guides and porters prepare and pack the supplies and your equipment at the park's gate and registration. You start trekking through the rainforest until completes this day by entering to our first camp where your tent is setup with your personal belongings inside
-Walking distance: 6 km, 3-4 hrs
All meals are included (breakfast this day not included in budget package)

Day 2: Mti Mkubwa camp (2810m) - Shira 2 camp (3505m)
You depart from Mti Mkubwa to the second camp through heath and Moorland zone, following the Shira ridge we enter vast high altitude desert plateau where the first view of Mount Kilimanjaro unfold one the horizon
-Walking Distance: 8 km, 6-8 hrs
All meals are included

Day 3: Shira camp 2 (3505m) -Barranco camp(3950m)
The route now turns east into a semi desert and rocky landscape surrounding Lava Tower. We leave from Shira to Moir camp which is nested near enormous beds of volcanic rock and surrounded by rocky hills and cliffs. We test our acclimatization with a trek to the base of Lava tower at 4500m, following our rest we descent through senecio forest passing waterfalls that usher us into the Barranco camp. The camp is set in the shadow of the massive Barranco wall with easterly breezes often carrying misty clouds from the Barranco Valley. Trekking time: 7 - 9 hrs
All meals are included

Day 4: Barranco Camp(3950m) - Karanga Camp(3995m)
Today's task will be the 150m face of the Barranco wall. Realization of how hard the porters works will be realized as this challenging scramble provides quite the balancing act for our crew. We arrive at the camp for a well deserved dinner and overnight
-Walking distance: 3-5hrs, 5km
All meals are included

Day 5: Karanga Camp(3995m) - Barafu Camp(4600m)
After breakfast with picnic lunch en route, the morning trek is slow and steady uphill hike as we enter the Arctic zone. The temperatures becomes noticeably cooler, however excitement fills our camp as we take final preparations for the summit day ahead.
-Walking distance: 3-5hrs, 4km
All meals are included

Day 6: Summit attempt, Barafu Camp (4600m) - Uhuru Peak (5895m) - Mweka Camp (3100m)
Today we face our greatest challenge, and meet the most rewarding point. An early wakeup call for preparation and light breakfast before starting the summit around 01.00hrs. Spectacular view coupled with the sunrise will warm the soul and strengthen the spirit as the iconic Uhuru peak is now on sight. After the elation of a well earned summit, we descend back to Barafu camp for a nice break and celebration before continuing to Mweka camp
-Walking Distance: 12-14hrs, 21km
All meals are included

Day 7: Mweka Camp(3100m)- Mweka gate
Descend from Mweka camp to the park gate where you are transferred back to your hotel for a well deserved shower.
-Walking Distance: 3-4hrs, 10km
Breakfast included, you will be back in Moshi by lunch time - overnight accommodation is included this night as part of the climb package.

A few short years ago this was a seldom used route. Now Lemosho 8 days has become our most requested itinerary. It is popular for good reason though since with 8 days the acclimatization is very good and it is a scenic route. We expect the Grand Traverse route to alleviate some of the crowd that this route has drawn.

Day 1: Hotel - Londorossi Gate (2360m) - Mti Mkubwa Camp (2810m)
Your day starts early with a breakfast from the hotel, followed by a briefing by your head guide and then a 2-hour drive from the hotel (910m) to Londorossi Park Gate (2360m). The guides and porters prepare and pack the supplies and your equipment at the park's gate and registration. You start trekking through the rain-forest. You complete the day by entering to our first camp where your tent is setup with your personal belongings inside.
-Walking distance: 6km, 3-4hrs
All meals are included (breakfast not included in the budget package for this day).

Day 2: Mti Mkubwa Camp (2810m) - Shira 2 Camp (3505m)
You depart from Mti Mkubwa to the second camp through heath and Moorland zone, following the Shira ridge we enter vast high altitude desert plateau where the first view of Mount Kilimanjaro unfolds one the horizon.
-Walking Distance: 8km, 6-8hrs
All meals are included

Day 3: Shira camp 2 (3505m)-Moir Camp(4160m)
The route now turns east into a semi desert and rocky landscape surrounding Lava Tower. We leave from Shira to Moir Camp which is nested near enormous beds of volcanic rock and surrounded by rocky hills and cliffs. At the arrival of camp you enter your tent which is already set with your belongings inside.
-Walking Distance: 9 km, 6-8 hrs
All meals are included

Day 4: Moir Camp(4160m) - Barranco Camp(3950m)- Acclimatization Day
After spending a night at the Moir camp today we test our acclimatization with a trek to the base of Lava tower at 4500m, following our rest we descent through senecio forest passing waterfalls that usher us into the Barranco camp. The camp is set in the shadow of the massive Barranco wall with easterly breezes often carrying misty clouds from the Barranco valley.
-Walking distance: 5-7hrs, 7km
All meals are included

Day 5: Barranco camp(3950m) - Karanga camp(39950m)
Today's task will be the 150m face of the Barranco wall. Realization of how hard the porters works will be realized as this challenging scramble provides quite the balancing act for our crew. We arrive at the camp for a well deserved dinner and overnight
-Walking distance: 3-5hrs, 5km
All meals are included

Day 6: Karanga Camp(3995m) - Barafu Camp(4600m)
After breakfast with picnic lunch en route, the morning trek is slow and steady uphill hike as we enter the arctic zone, The temperatures becomes noticeably cooler, however excitement fills our camp as we take final preparations for the summit day ahead.
-Walking distance: 3-5hrs, 4km
All meals are included

Day 7: Summit attempts, Barafu Camp (4600m) - Uhuru Peak (5895m) - Mweka Camp (3100m)
Today we face our greatest challenge, and meet the most rewarding point. An early wakeup call for preparation and light breakfast before starting the summit around 01.00hrs. Spectacular view coupled with the sunrise will warm the soul and strengthen the spirit as the iconic Uhuru peak is now on sight. After the elation of a well earned summit, we descend back to Barafu camp for a nice break and celebration before continuing to Mweka camp
-Walking Distance: 12-14hrs, 21km
All meals are included

Day 8: Mweka Camp(3100m)- Mweka gate
Descend from Mweka camp to the park gate where you are transferred back to your hotel for a well deserved shower.
-Walking Distance: 3-4hrs, 10km
Breakfast included. You will be back in Moshi before lunchtime.

Day 1: Machame Gate (1800m) - Machame Camp (3000m)
Arrive to the Machame Gate from Moshi and have an introduction to your guides and porters. Registration is done and thereafter start climb with picnic lunch through rain forest for approximately 4 to 5 hrs where you arrive to the Machame Camp. Later afternoon walk up to a little higher altitude is done for acclimatization. Return to Machame Camp for dinner and overnight. Lunch and dinner on the mountain included, breakfast at hotel (no breakfast included this day in the budget plan).

Day 2: Machame Camp (3000m) - Shira Camp (3800m)
After breakfast, start climb through short Savannah, forest and other vegetation for approximately 4 to 5hrs, with picnic lunch en route before arriving in the afternoon at the Shira Hut. In Shira is where an extra day can be spent for acclimatization when climbing takes 7 days or more, dinner and overnight at Shira hut.
All meals are included (breakfast, lunch and dinner)

Day 3: Shira (3800m) - Barranco (3950m)
After breakfast a slow walk through semi glacier and sandy areas with picnic lunch 3 to 4 hrs before arriving at the Barranco Hut for dinner and overnight.
All meals are included (breakfast, lunch and dinner)

Day 4: Barranco Hut (3950m) - Barafu Hut (4600m)
After breakfast, with picnic lunch enroute climb through glaciers for approximately 4 to 5 hours before arriving the Barafu Hut for dinner and overnight.
All meals are included (breakfast, lunch and dinner)

Day 5: Barafu Hut (4600m) Uhuru Peak (5895m) Mweka (3100m)
An early wake up call around 01.00hrs for preparation and light breakfast before starting final ascent to the summit i.e. either the Stella Point reached in approximately 5 to 6 hrs and a further ascent to the Uhuru Peak reached in another approx 45 minutes. After signing and short rest at Barafu Hut descend via the Gilman's Point down to Mweka Hut for an hours rest with light breakfast then descend down for dinner and overnight at Mweka Hut.
All meals are included (breakfast, lunch and dinner)

Day 6: Descend from Mweka Hut to the park gate from where you are transferred back to your hotel for a well deserved shower. Breakfast included - you should be back in Moshi by lunch time.

Day 1: Machame Gate (1800m) - Machame Camp (3000m)
Arrive at the Machame Gate, introduction to your whole crew then do the registration at the park’s gate. After registration is done you start climb through rain forest with picnic lunch for approximately 4 to 5 hrs where you arrive to the Machame Camp. Later afternoon walk up to a little higher altitude then you return to Machame Camp for dinner and overnight.
Walking duration: 5-7 hrs, 11 km
Breakfast at your hotel (budget package does not include breakfast this day), lunch and dinner on the mountain are included.

Day 2: Machame Camp (3000m) - Shira Camp (3800m)
After breakfast, start climb through short Savannah, forest and other vegetation for approximately 4 to 5hrs, with picnic lunch en route before arriving in the afternoon at the Shira Camp, dinner and overnight at Shira Camp.
Walking Duration: 4-6 hrs, 5 km
All meals are included (breakfast, lunch and dinner)

Day 3: Shira Camp(3800m) - Barranco Camp(3950m)
After breakfast a slow walk through semi glacier and sandy areas with picnic lunch 3 to 4 hrs before arriving at the Barranco Camp for dinner and overnight rest.
Walking duration: 6-8 hrs, 10 km
All meals are included (breakfast, lunch and dinner)

Day 4: Barranco Camp (3950m)-Karanga Valley Camp (3995m) - Acclimatization day
A day of acclimatization with a walk to Karanga Valley Camp (3963 m)
Walking duration: 4-5 hrs, 5 km
All meals are included (breakfast,lunch and dinner)

Day 5: Karanga Valley (3995m) - Barafu Camp (4600m)
After breakfast, with picnic lunch enroute climb through glaciers for approximately 4 to 5 hours before arriving the Barafu Camp for dinner and overnight.
Walking duration: 4-5 hrs, 4 km
All meals are included (breakfast, lunch and dinner)

Day 6: Barafu Camp (4600m) - Uhuru Peak (5895m) - Mweka Camp(3100m)
An early wakeup call around 01.00hrs for preparation and light breakfast before starting final ascent to the summit i.e. either the Stella Point reached in approximately 5 to 6 hrs and a further ascent to the Uhuru Peak reached in another approx 45 minutes. After signing and short rest at Barafu Hut descend via the Gilman’s Point down to Mweka Camp for an hours rest with light breakfast then descend down for dinner and overnight at Mweka Camp.
Walking duration: 11-14 hrs, 17 km
All meals are included (breakfast, lunch and dinner)

Day 7: Mweka Camp (3100) – Mweka Gate (1640m)
Descend from Mweka Camp to the park gate from where you are transferred back to your hotel for a well deserved shower
Walking duration: 3-4 hrs, 10 km
Breakfast included. You should be back in Moshi by lunchtime.
Overnight included in climb package.

DAY 1: Rongai Gate (1950m) - Rongai Cave Camp (2830m)
Depart Moshi in the morning and drive to Marangu Gate for registration. We transfer by road to Nale Moru (1,950m) to begin our climb on this unspoilt wilderness route. The first day is only a half-day walk on a small path that winds through farmland and pine plantations. It is a consistent but gentle climb through attractive forest that shelters a variety of wildlife. We reach our first overnight stop by late afternoon at the edge of the moorland zone.
Walking Distance: 4 hrs, 7 km
Breakfast, lunch and dinner included (breakfast not included in budget package)

DAY 2: Rongai Cave (2830m) – 2nd Cave (3450m) – Kikelelwa Cave (3600m)
The trail continues up towards Kibo, passing Second Cave (3450m) en-route, and reaching Kikelwa Cave at about 3600 metres. The views start to open up and you begin to feel you're on a really big mountain! Water is in the obvious stream below the cave, although you might have to wander downhill a way to find some.
Walking distance: 6-8 hrs, 11 km
Breakfast, lunch and dinner included

DAY 3: Kikelewa Cave (3600) - Mawenzi Tarn Camp (4330m)
A short but steep climb up grassy slopes offers superb views of this wilderness area. The vegetation zone ends shortly before you reach your next camp at Mawenzi Tarn spectacularly situated beneath the towering spires of Mawenzi. Spend the afternoon acclimatizing and exploring the area.
Walking Distance: 4-5 hrs, 6 km
Breakfast, lunch and dinner included

DAY 4: Mawenzi Tarn Camp (4330m) - Kibo Hut (4703m)
Continue ascending on the east side of Kibo crossing the saddle between Mawenzi and Kibo taking 4 to 5 hours to reach Kibo Hut. The remainder of the day is spent resting in preparation for the final ascent, which begins around midnight.
Walking Distance: 4-5 hrs, 6 km
Breakfast, lunch and dinner included

DAY 5: (Summit Attempt) Kibo Hut (4700m) - Uhuru Peak (5895m) - Horombo Hut (3720m)
You will rise around 23h30, and after some tea and biscuits you shuffle off into the night. This is where the going really gets tough. The first section of the trail consists of a rocky path to the Hans Meyer Cave (5150m), also a good resting spot. The path then zigzags up to Gillman's point (5 681m), which is located on the crater rim. This section is very steep with a lot of stone scree, requiring a great physical and mental effort. This is probably the most demanding section of the entire route. Do the Kili shuffle and move slowly. From Gillman's Point you will normally encounter snow all the way up to Uhuru peak (5895m), the highest point in Africa. Total exhilaration and satisfaction - you made it. Weather conditions on the summit will determine how long you can spend, taking photographs, before the 3-hour descent back to Kibo hut. After a short rest you gather all your gear for the ascent and head down to Horombo hut (3 hours) where you will overnight. The return to Horombo hut will seem surprisingly fast compared to the ascent. The total time spent walking on this day is around 14 hours, so be prepared for a very tough day. Later in the evening you enjoy your last dinner (with soft drinks and beer for sale at the camp office) on the mountain and well earned sleep, filled with memories and stirring emotions.
Walking distance: 6 kms ascent, 21 kms descent
Breakfast, lunch and dinner included

DAY 6: Horombo Hut (at 3720m) to Marangu Gate (at 1980m)
After breakfast you continue your descent (6 hours), passing the Mandara hut, down to the Marangu gate. It is strongly recommended not to pay your porters any tips until you and all your gear have reached the gate safely. View more Mt Kilimanjaro tips. At Marangu gate you sign your name and details in a register. This is also where successful climbers receive their summit certificates. Those climbers who reached Gillman's Point (5685m) are issued with green certificates and those who reached Uhuru Peak (5895m) receive gold certificates. You now are driven back to Moshi for a long overdue hot shower, dinner and celebrations!!
Walking distance: 5-7 hrs, 20 km

Day 1: Rongai 1st Caves Camp (9,285 ft./ 2,830 m)
Depart Moshi morning and drive to Marangu Gate for registration. After registration, proceed with a drive to the Rongai gate for about 5hrs. Today’s walk is at a leisurely pace through fields and then into the rainforest. Dinner and overnight at Rongai 1st Caves Camp.

Day 2: Rongai 2 Caves Camp (11,300 ft./ 3,450 m)
About 4-5 hours climb through the heather will bring you to second caves. If the weather is clear, Mawenzi will be in plain view; a stunning sight. Enjoy stopping to see the interesting heather-zone flowers and plants which grow alongside the trail. Dinner and overnight at Rongai 2 Caves Camp.

Day 3: Kikelewa Caves Camp (11,800 ft./ 3600 m)
Today is a short trek designed to help you acclimatize. A smaller track leads off the main trail through the moorland and towards Mawenzi’s steeply rising slopes (Mawenzi peak). The trekking time is about 3 – 5 hours, arriving in camp for a hot lunch, and a chance to acclimatize while exploring the surrounding landscape of bizarre plants and rock formations and caves. Dinner and overnight at Kikelelwa caves camp.

Day 4: Mawenzi Tarn Camp (14,160 ft./ 4,315 m)
Trek from the moorland and eventually into the stark highland desert towards Mawenzi, on trails not frequented by many tourists. From the Tarn Campsite you will enjoy a magnificent view across the saddle towards Kibo, your final target. Total trekking time is 5-7 hours. Dinner and overnight at Mawenzi Tarn Camp.

Day 5: Kibo Hut (15,585 ft./ 4,750 m)
The trekking time today is 5 - 7 hours, though a relatively easy hike across the wide saddle between Mawenzi and Kibo. The trek takes you across the massive saddle. The crossing is impressive and the landscape spectacularly stark. Prepare all your gear for the night ahead, and arrive in early to rest.

DAY 6: Horombo Camp ( up to 19,340 ft./ 5,895m then down to 10,200 ft./ 3,110 m)
You are awoken at midnight, and depart the camp at about 1am. From your camp to the rim of the crater Gilman’s Point (18,750 ft./ 5,712 m) to Uhuru Peak, the trekking time is about 7 - 8 hours. Upon your 1am departure, the temperatures will be between -0 to -10° C, and then from 4am to 6am (just before sunrise), you can expect temperatures from -10° to -20° C. The slope is steep , with switchbacks, over loose rock and scree with some boulders as you near Gilman’s Point. You will stop at Hans Meyer cave on the way, the famous place where Kilimanjaro’s first western climber described in his journals. Once you arrive at Gilman’s Point (after about 5 - 6 hours) at the edge of the crater, the trail to the summit is less demanding, and is reached after a further 1½-2 hours along the snowy crater rim (depending on the season). After 3 hours of descending to Kibo Hut, there is a pause for rest & food, then another 3 to 4 hours to reach Horombo Hut.

Day 7: Marangu Gate to Moshi Hotel
Descend straight to the gate (5 - 6 hours), where you will collect your certificate then meet your driver and transfer to your hotel in Moshi for a long hot shower.

DAY 1: Marangu Gate (1980m) - Mandara Hut (2700m)
After breakfast, transfer to Marangu gate and start the climb through fascinating rain forests till you reach the first hut Mandara.
Meals and overnight at the hut. (9,000ft).

DAY 2: Mandara Hut (2700m) - Horombo Hut (3720m)
After breakfast, follow the ascending path through the alpine – meadow. The altitude begins to change and slowdown your pace while enjoying the flora and the view of Mawenzi and Kibo peaks. Arrive at the Horombo Hut 12km from Mandara. Meals and overnight at the hut. (12,520ft).

DAY 3: Horombo Hut (3720m) - Kibo Hut (4700m)
After breakfast, resume the climb, the landscape becomes rugged and rocky. Lobelias begin to appear. Climb to Kibo Hut. Meals and overnight at the hut. (15,520ft)

DAY 4: SUMMIT ATTEMPT!! Kibo Hut (4700m) - Uhuru Peak (5895m) - Horombo Hut (3720m)
The beginning of the last ascent is made in the wee hrs of the morning while the scree is still frozen. Climb the very steep part of the route to GILMANS POINT (most difficult and tiring part). UHURU PEAK is reached within an hour's walk along the crater rim. (19,344ft). Start the walk along the craters rim. (19,344ft). Start the descent to Horombo hut for overnight

DAY 5: Horombo Hut (3720m) - Marangu Gate (1980m)
Return to a hotel in Moshi/Arusha. After lunch, have a good rest, meals and overnight at your hotel.

DAY 1: Marangu Gate (1980m) - Mandara hut (2700m)
After breakfast, transfer to Marangu gate and start the climb through fascinating rain forests till you reach the first hut Mandara. Meals and overnight at the hut. (9,000ft).

DAY 2:Mandara hut (2700m) - Horombo hut (3720m)
After breakfast, follow the ascending path through the alpine – meadow. The altitude begins to change and slowdown your pace while enjoying the flora and the view of Mawenzi and Kibo peaks. Arrive at the Horombo Hut 12km from Mandara. Meals and overnight at the hut. (12,520ft).

Day 3: Horombo Hut (Acclimitazation Day)
Today we walk towards the Mawenzi hut, passing the Zebra Rocks, this extra day and night at Horombo is for additional acclimatization. We recommend drinking enough water and walking slowly! All meals for the day are provided at the Horombo hut. Horombo hut to further improve our acclimatization.

DAY 4: Horombo Hut (3720m) - Kibo Hut (4700m)
After breakfast, resume the climb, the landscape becomes rugged and rocky. Lobelias begin to appear. Climb to Kibo Hut.
Meals and overnight at the hut. (15,520ft)

DAY 5: SUMMIT ATTEMPT!! Kibo Hut (4700m) - Uhuru Peak (5895m) - Horombo Hut (3720m)
The beginning of the last ascent is made in the wee hrs of the morning while the scree is still frozen. Climb the very steep part of the route to GILMANS POINT (most difficult and tiring part). UHURU PEAK is reached within an hour's walk along the crater rim. (19,344ft). Start the walk along the crater’s rim. (19,344ft). Start the descent to Horombo hut for overnight

DAY 6:Horombo hut (3720m) - Marangu Gate (1980m)
Return to your hotel in Moshi. After lunch, have a good rest, meals and overnight at your hotel.

Day 1: Moshi to Umbwe Gate to Umbwe Camp
Elevation(m): 915m/1387m to 1,800 m 2,800 m
Elevation(ft): 3,000 ft/4921ft to 5,905 ft to 9,190 ft
Distance: 8 km
Hiking Time: 5-7 hours
Habitat: Montane Forest
Your day starts early with a briefing, followed by breakfast and an hour drive from Moshi/Arusha to Umbwe Village (1,490 m/4,890 ft) where your guides and porters pack your equipment and supplies, and give you a lunch pack. You start your ascent at the small Umbwe Gate just above the village and follow a gentle winding vehicle track for an hour to a signboard that announces the small steep Umbwe trail. The introduction is over, and you now climb up for several hours through a dense forest of rubber trees and giant fig trees. In places, you must scamper up steep sections of roots and rock. The Umbwe Camp is in the forest, and there are some caves nearby. You will be greeted here with a graciously served hot meal.

Day 2: Umbwe Camp to Barranco Camp
Elevation(m): 2,800 m to 3,900 m
Elevation(ft): 9,190 ft to 2,800 ft
Distance: 8 km,
Hiking Time : 4-5 hours
Habitat : Semi-Desert
Your day starts early with a steaming cup of tea coffee. After breakfast, you will climb steeply through thinning forest glades to giant Erica, heather, and drier air. You continue up a ridge that drops steeply on both sides, and hopefully, the clouds will part to reward you with a view of Uhuru Peak looming overhead. After lunch, you enter a zone of giant groundsels (Seneci Kilimanjari) that seem to guard the heights, and this garden is one of Kilimanjaro’s special treasures.

Day 3: Barranco Camp to Karanga Camp
Elevation(m): 3,900 m to 4,200 m
Elevation (ft):12,800 ft to 13,780 ft
Distance: 7 km,
Hiking time: 4 hours
Habitat: Alpine Desert
After breakfast, we continue up a steep ridge to the great Barranco Wall, then you climb this imposing obstacle, which turns out to be easier than it looks. Topping out just below the Heim Glacier, you can now appreciate just how beautiful Kilimanjaro really is. With Kibo’s glaciers soaring overhead, you descend into the lush Karanga Valley to the Karanga Valley campsite. From the camp, you can look east and see the jagged peaks of Mawenzi jutting into the African sky. After a hot lunch in camp, your afternoon is at leisure for resting or exploring. This short day is very important for your acclimatization, since your summit push is about to start.

Day 4: Karanga Camp to Barafu Camp
Elevation(m): 4,200 m to 4,550 m
Elevation(ft): 13,780 ft to 14,930 ft
Distance: 13 km,
Hiking Time: 8 hours
Habitat: Alpine Desert
In the morning, you hike east over intervening ridges and valleys to join the Mweka Route, which will be your descent route. Turn left toward the mountain and hike up the ridge through a sparse landscape for another hour to the Barafu Hut where you will receive a hot lunch. The last water on the route is in the Karanga Valley; there is no water at Barafu Camp, even though Barafu is the Swahili word for “ice.” The famous snows of Kilimanjaro are far above Barafu Camp near the summit of the mountain. Your tent will be pitched on a narrow, stony, wind-swept ridge, so make sure that you familiarize yourself with the terrain before dark to avoid any accidents. Prepare your equipment and warm clothing for your summit climb, and drink a lot of fluids. After an early dinner, go to bed for a few hours of precious sleep.

Day 5: Summit Day! Barafu Camp to Uhuru Peak to Mweka Camp
Elevation(m): 4,550 m to 5,895 m to 3,100 m
Elevation(ft):14,930 ft to 19,340 ft to 10,170 ft
Distance: 7 km up, 23 km down
Hiking Time: 8 hours up, 7-8 hours down
Habitat: Scree and seasonal snow
You will rise around 11:30 PM, and after some steaming tea and biscuits, you shuffle off into the night. Your 6-hour climb northwest up through heavy scree between the Rebmann and Ratzel glaciers to Stella Point on the crater rim is the most challenging part of the route for most climbers. At Stella Point (5,685 m/18,650 ft) you stop for a short rest and a chance to see a supremely sanguine sunrise. At Stella Point you join the top part of the Marangu Route, but do not stop here too long, as it will be extremely difficult to start again due to cold and fatigue. Depending on the season and recent storms, you may encounter snow on your remaining hike along the rim to Uhuru Peak. On the summit, you can enjoy your accomplishment and know that you are creating a day that you will remember for the rest of your life. After your 3-hour descent from the summit back to Barafu Camp, you will have a well-earned but short rest, collect your gear, and hike down a rock and scree path into the moorland and eventually into the forest to Mweka Camp (3,100 m/10,170 ft). This camp is in the upper forest, so you can expect mist or rain in the late afternoon.

Day 6: Mweka Camp to Mweka Gate to Moshi
Elevation(m): 3,100 m to 1,980m to890m/1387m
Elevation(ft): 10,170 ft to 6,500m to 2,920 ft/4921ft
Distance: 15 km
Hiking Time: 3 hours
Habitat: Forest
After a well-deserved breakfast, it is a short, scenic, 3-hour hike back to the park gate. Don’t give your porters any tips until you and all your gear have reached the gate safely, but do remember to tip your staff at the gate. At Mweka Gate, you can sign your name and add details in a register. This is also where successful climbers receive their summit certificates. Climbers who reached Stella Point are issued green certificates and those who reached Uhuru Peak receive gold certificates. From the Mweka Gate, you will continue down to the Mweka Village, possibly a muddy, 3 km, 1 hour hike if the road is too muddy for vehicles. From there our vehicle will be waiting to take you back to Moshi.

Day 1: Moshi to Umbwe Gate to Umbwe Camp
Elevation(m): 915m/1387m to 1,800 m 2,800 m
Elevation(ft): 3,000 ft/4921ft to 5,905 ft to 9,190 ft
Distance: 8 km
Hiking Time: 5-7 hours
Habitat: Montane Forest
Your day starts early an hour drive from Moshi to Umbwe Village (1,490 m/4,890 ft) where your guides and porters pack your equipment and supplies, and give you a lunch pack. You start your ascent at the small Umbwe Gate just above the village and follow a gentle winding vehicle track for an hour to a signboard that announces the small steep Umbwe trail. The introduction is over, and you now climb up for several hours through a dense forest of rubber trees and giant fig trees. In places, you must scamper up steep sections of roots and rock. The Umbwe Camp is in the forest, and there are some caves nearby. You will be greeted here with a graciously served hot meal.

Day 2: Umbwe Camp to Barranco Camp
Elevation(m): 2,800 m to 3,900 m
Elevation(ft): 9,190 ft to 2,800 ft
Distance: 8 km
Hiking Time: 4-5 hours
Habitat: Semi-Desert
After breakfast, you will climb steeply through thinning forest glades to Giant Erica, Heather, and drier air. You continue up a ridge that drops steeply on both sides, and hopefully, the clouds will part to reward you with a view of Uhuru Peak looming overhead. After lunch, you enter a zone of giant groundsels (Seneci Kilimanjari) that seem to guard the heights, and this garden is one of Kilimanjaro’s special treasures.

Day 3: Barranco Camp to Karanga Camp
Elevation (m): 3,900 m to 4,200 m
Elevation (ft):12,800 ft to 13,780 ft
Distance: 7 km,
Hiking time: 4 hours
Habitat: Alpine Desert
After breakfast, we continue up a steep ridge to the great Barranco Wall. Then you climb this imposing obstacle, which turns out to be easier than it looks. Topping out just below the Heim Glacier, you can now appreciate just how beautiful Kilimanjaro really is. With Kibo’s glaciers soaring overhead, you descend into the lush Karanga Valley to the Karanga Valley campsite. From the camp, you can look east and see the jagged peaks of Mawenzi jutting into the African sky. After a hot lunch in camp, your afternoon is at leisure for resting or exploring.

Day 4: Karanga Camp
Elevation (m): 3,900 m to 4,200 m
Elevation (ft):12,800 ft to 13,780 ft
Hiking time: 1- 2 hours
Habitat: Alpine Desert
This day gives your body a chance to acclimatize. You will take a short leisurely hike through the surrounding area, exercising your lungs and muscles in the thin air, returning back to Karanga Camp for rest.

Day 5: Karanga Camp to Barafu Camp
Elevation (m): 4,200 m to 4,550 m
Elevation (ft): 13,780 ft to 14,930 ft
Distance: 13 km,
Hiking Time: 8 hours
Habitat: Alpine Desert
In the morning, you hike east over intervening ridges and valleys to join the Mweka Route, which will be your descent route. Turn left toward the mountain and hike up the ridge through sparse landscape for another hour to the Barafu Hut where you will receive a hot lunch. The last water on the route is in the Karanga Valley; there is no water at Barafu Camp, even though Barafu is the Swahili word for “ice.” The famous snows of Kilimanjaro are far above Barafu Camp near the summit of the mountain. Your tent will be pitched on a narrow, stony, wind-swept ridge, so make sure that you familiarize yourself with the terrain before dark to avoid any accidents. Prepare your equipment and warm clothing for your summit climb, and drink a lot of fluids. After an early dinner, go to bed for a few hours of precious sleep.

Day 6: Summit Day! Barafu Camp to Uhuru Peak to Mweka Camp
Elevation(m): 4,550 m to 5,895 m to 3,100 m
Elevation(ft):14,930 ft to 19,340 ft to 10,170 ft
Distance: 7 km up, 23 km down
Hiking Time: 8 hours up, 7-8 hours down
Habitat: Scree and seasonal snow
You will rise around 11:30 PM, and after some steaming tea and biscuits, you shuffle off into the night. Your 6-hour climb northwest up through heavy scree between the Rebmann and Ratzel glaciers to Stella Point on the crater rim is the most challenging part of the route for most climbers. At Stella Point (5,685 m/18,650 ft) you stop for a short rest and a chance to see a supremely sanguine sunrise. At Stella Point you join the top part of the Marangu Route, but do not stop here too long, as it will be extremely difficult to start again due to cold and fatigue. Depending on the season and recent storms, you may encounter snow on your remaining hike along the rim to Uhuru Peak. On the summit, you can enjoy your accomplishment and know that you are creating a day that you will remember for the rest of your life. After your 3-hour descent from the summit back to Barafu Camp, you will have a well-earned but short rest, collect your gear, and hike down a rock and scree path into the moorland and eventually into the forest to Mweka Camp (3,100 m/10,170 ft). This camp is in the upper forest, so you can expect mist or rain in the late afternoon.

Day 7: Mweka Camp to Mweka Gate to Moshi
Elevation(m): 3,100 m to 1,980m to890m/1387m
Elevation(ft): 10,170 ft to 6,500m to 2,920 ft/4921ft
Distance: 15 km
Hiking Time: 3 hours
Habitat: Forest
After a well-deserved breakfast, it is a short, scenic, 3-hour hike back to the park gate. At Mweka Gate, you can sign your name and add details in a register. This is also where successful climbers receive their summit certificates. Climbers who reached Stella Point are issued green certificates and those who reached Uhuru Peak receive gold certificates. From the Mweka Gate, you will continue down to the Mweka Village, possibly a muddy, 3 km, 1 hour hike if the road is too muddy for vehicles.

Kilimanjaro Trek FAQ

The most common questions clients have about treks

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Kilimanjaro FAQ

Q: How difficult is a Mt Kilimanjaro climb? A: We interview all climbers afterwards. The most common response when asked if it was easier or harder than they thought it would be is: "It was easier than we thought until it became much harder than we thought."

Q: Are there any times of the year that are better to climb than others? A: We offer climbs using any route during any time of the year. But during the two rain seasons (March - May, November - December) it can be more challenging, especially during March - May. The north side of the mountain receives less precipitation so you may consider choosing Rongai or Grand Traverse Routes during wet months.

Q: Can I arrive the same day as starting my climb? A: Only if the arrival time is very early (no later than 5am). Before the climb, we will go through an equipment check and you will have a briefing with your guide. Ideally, this is done the day before the climb but it can be done in the early morning before departing for the climb.

Q: Where will anything that I don't want to take on the mountain be stored? A: Gladys Adventure office has a secured storage room just for this purpose. There is no charge for this service.

Q: Can't I just show up at the park gate and climb without going through a tour company? A: Park regulations require a mountain guide certified by Kilimanjaro National Park. Also, park fees are only payable through a registered tour company.

Q: Do I really need to have porters on the climb? A: You can reduce the number of porters but it is unlikely that you can eliminate them. It is against park regulations for the guide to carry any equipment, so he will need a porter. It is unlikely that you can carry his equipment and food in addition to yours.

Q: If I finish a climb early can I get a portion of the trek cost refunded? A: No. Park fees must be paid in advance. Also our agreement with the climb staff is for the set number of days that you had scheduled. If you finish a climb early, you also will be responsible for any extra hotel nights used.

Q: During the climb, can I add an extra day if I need to? A: For a private climb, yes. The entire group would need to add the extra day. The additional cost (approximately $300/person) would be charged when you return from the climb.

Q: What are the toilets like on the mountain? Mt Kilimanjaro public toiletA: Pretty basic. There is no plumbing on the mountain. The toilets will be a shed with a deep hole. We provide toilet paper but it is best to take another roll or two along.


Q: Can the private toilet tents be used anywhere along the route?Mt Kilimanjaro public toilet A: The private toilets are included in private climbs using the luxury package or can be added for $150 with the standard package and open group climbs. A private toilet tent will be set up at the camps. If you request, we can also have them available at your lunch stops. During the day's climb, you have to resort to a bush or rock for privacy.


Q: Do you have shower tents availablle? A: Yes, one can be rented for $150 for the trek but we do not recommend it because in colder temperatures, if your body is not well dried, the moisture will make you chilled and uncomfortable. We will give you hand towels with warm water so you can sponge bathe.

Q: If one person in my group cannot continue the climb, do we all abandon the climb? A: No. Even with a group of 2 people there will be an assistant guide. A group of 4 people have 2 assistant guides, a group of 8 will have 3 assistant guides. Each assistant guide is well trained to handle emergencies. If a climber cannot continue, an assistant guide (or head guide, depending on the severity) will take care of the climber with some porters while the others continue the climb. Having assistant guides also means that there is no pressure on climbers who are slower walking than others in the group.

Q: If someone in our group requires a special diet, does that affect what food the rest of us eat? A: Not at all. Our chefs will prepare a separate meal for them apart from what you have.

Q: What food preservation precautions do you use on the mountain? A: All climbs have their provisions resupplied during the climb. Fresh foods will be brought up the mountain. Before the climb, meats are bought fresh then frozen before departure. As the temperatures drop at the higher altitudes, the food preservation takes care of itself.

Q: Will the guides speak English? A: Yes, that is an important requirement for all guides and assistant guides. They will speak excellent English. The porters on the otherhand most likely will not be very good at English. If requested early, we can arrange a guide that speaks other languages (spanish, french, japanese, etc).

Q: What time will my climb finish? A: For Machame route, Lemosho route, Grand Traverse route, or Umbwe route you will finish on the last day in the morning hours. Treks typically will be back in Moshi by 10:30 - 11 am. If you choose Rongai route or Marangu route, the last day is longer, you would typically be back in Moshi around 4pm. For the routes that finish early, it is possible to fly out that same afternoon/evening. Or it is possible to depart on a safari that afternoon.

Q: Can I get cell phone/internet signal on the mountain? A: In spots it is possible. Your guide will have a walkie talkie. We have our own channel so our office can always be in communication with the group.

Q: Is there any electronics charging facilites on the mountain? A: No. If you have a portable solar charger you might want to bring it.

Q: How can some companies charge substancially less than Gladys Adventure? A: The most likely reason would be if they are not members of Kilimanjaro Porters Assistance Project (KPAP). By being a member, we have agreed certain salary and work conditions/benefits for the climb staff. Each climb is evaluated by KPAP for compliance. There is no charge for membership, so the only reason a company would not want to be a member is because they do not want to comply with the standards. Some companies may boast that they pay the same as KPAP recomendations but what they do not say is that they may deduct for their meals, give only 2 meals a day, or not have mattresses for the staff. Gladys Adventure provides 3 meals a day, unlimited drinking water, mattresses, and the same emergency evacuation procedure as for our clients. Membership to KPAP also requires a company to be fully licensed (not only business license but also TALA license). Another common reason is not including items such as emergency oxygen, not using trained Wilderness First Responders for guides, etc.

We will be happy to answer any questions that you might have that are not on this list. Please contact us at info@gladysadventure.com

Partners for Responsible Travel

We are proud partners of Kilimanjaro Porters Assistance Program. Click to read about their valuable program. Kilimanjaro Porters Association

Climb Staff Tipping

What you need to know about the tipping process and procedures...

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Everything you need to know about mountain crew tipping

How many crew members will there be on my climb?
While we will know in advance how many guides, assistant guides and cooks you will have for a climb, we will not know how many porters will be used until the morning of the climb. The maximum weight allowed for each porter to carry is 20kg. They are allowed 5kg of personal gear that reduces the amount of other weight that will be carried. Of course, they also need 3 meals a day and a mattress (not all companies supply these for porters, but we do). So once the total weight of all itmes being brought on the mountain is weighed we will know the definite crew numbers. Typically for a small group (4 climbers or less), a rough estimate of the number of porters is 4 porters/climber. For larger groups, approximately 3 porters per climber. Marangu route (overnights in huts) will use about 1 porter per climber less. While we can accommodate group sizes of any number, the national park treats groups over 10 people as 2 climbs. This means that for more than 10 in your group, there will be 2 head guides, 2 cooks, etc. The group will still be together as one group on the mountain though.

How much is a recommended tip?
Recommended tipping rates range from
$20 - $30/day for head guide
$15 - $20/day for each assistant guide
$15 - $20/day for cook
$5 - $7/day for each porter
These are only guidelines. It is up to you and your budget if you want to vary from this. Some porters will have special duties in addition such as waiters and summit porters. You may consider adding an amount for these porters.

Exactly how and when is the tipping done?
You will not need to bring any money with you on the mountain. You will distribute tips when you get back to Gladys Adventure office after the climb. At the last camp, you will be given a paper listing everyone on the climb staff. You can discuss with others in your group how much you want to tip. If you wish, you can write down the amounts for each staff person and at the gate after finishing the climb you can announce the amount OR ... if you are too tired (not uncommon) at the camp or if you want input from our office you can wait until you get to our office. You do not need to ask and should not ask any of the climb staff about recommendations. Also, you should not feel pressured by any staff member to tip a certain amount or even any discussion about tips. If you have any questions at all, our office staff will be glad to help you once you return to Moshi. If you feel that certain crew members are pressuring you directly or indirectly be sure to let us know. Tactics include telling embellished hardship stories to gain your sympathy. Another is to purposely dress poorly. We make sure before the climb that all porters have proper shoes and jackets. If they are not wearing proper gear while on the mountian, they are trying to fool you. Kilimanjaro Porters Assistance Project (KPAP) has gear for any porter in need and their office is located 20 meters from our office. At our office, you can collect the money from each climb member and put them in individual envelopes that we will supply - one envelope for each climb staff member. They will then be distributed to the climb staff in your presence. If you need to go to an ATM we can take you. Unfortunately, tips cannot be paid through credit cards since the government will automatically treat this as a payment made to Gladys Adventure and charge us 18% VAT.

Sometimes we have clients who do not like the concept of tipping but want to make sure that the staff is adaquately provided for. It is ok to allot extra money to be paid as salary for the staff. The staff would then be told before the climb that their pay is being increased for the climb but no tips will be given afterwards.

If you wish to donate gear such as walking poles, clothing, etc this is best done through the office staff at Gladys Adventure or through KPAP office. The gear will then be distributed under supervision of KPAP.

Mountain Packing List

What you need for a safe and comfortable trek...

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Mountain Packing List

mountain packing list itemsBefore your climb we will go through a piece by piece equipment cheeck with you. Any item that you need can be rented at our shop (no prior reservations required). As our client you will receive a 50% discount from our listed prices. If you need to rent every item, this can be done for $180 (client price).

Equipment

  • 1 - Sleeping Bag -- we suggest a comfort rating of 0 °C (32 °F) plus a liner.
  • 1 - Trekking Poles, collapsable
  • 1 - Head lamp, with extra batteries
  • 1 - Duffel bag, 85L capacity or larger, for porters to carry your equipment
  • 1 - Daypack, 30-35L capacity, for you to carry your personal gear

Accessories

  • 1 - Sunglasses or Goggles ---important to be polarized
  • 1 - Backpack Cover, waterproof
  • 1 - 3 - Water Bottle(s) (Nalgene, 32 oz.)----you will need to carry 3L of water with you each day. It is best that not all water is in a Camelbak since too much chance of system breakdown or line freezing so best that at least some of your water is in a bottle. The park will not allow disposable bottles on the mountain.
  • 1 - Water Bladder (Camelbak type, 3 liters)--or carry 3L in water bottles as an alternative
  • 1 - Towel, lightweight, quick-dry (optional)
  • 1 - Pee Bottle, to avoid leaving tent at night (recommended - not as important if you have a private toilet tent)
  • Stuff Sacks, Dry Bags or Plastic Bags, various sizes, to keep gear dry and separate

Technical Clothing

  • 1 - Waterproof Jacket/Poncho, breathable with hood
  • 1 - Insulated Jacket, synthetic or down
  • 1 - Soft Jacket, fleece or soft-shell
  • 2 - Long Sleeve Shirt, light-weight, moisture-wicking fabric
  • 1 - Short Sleeve Shirt, light-weight, moisture-wicking fabric
  • 1 - Waterproof Pants, breathable (side zipper is ideal)
  • 2 - Hiking Pants
  • 1 - Fleece Pants
  • 1 - Shorts (optional)
  • 1 - Long Underwear, moisture-wicking fabric
  • 5 - Underwear, moisture-wicking fabric recommended
  • 2 - Sport Bra (women)

Headwear

  • 1 - Brimmed Hat, for sun/rain protection
  • 1 - Knit Hat, for warmth
  • 1 - Balaclava, scarf or Buff

Handwear

  • 1 - Gloves/mittens, warm and waterproof
  • 1 - Gloves (liner gloves)

Footwear

  • 1 - Hiking Boots, warm, waterproof, broken-in
  • 1 - Comfort Shoes, to wear at camp (optional)
  • 5 - Socks, wool or synthetic -- cotton does not dry quickly enough
  • 1 - Gaiters, waterproof
  • 5 - liner socks (optional)

Miscellaneous

  • Toiletries
  • Prescription medicine -- if using Diamox, this is readily available in Moshi.
  • Sunscreen -- the UV is quite strong so this is important even if you do not typically use this
  • Lip Balm -- important to have UV protection
  • Insect Repellent, containing DEET -- not in pressurized can. This is only needed at lower altitudes
  • First Aid Kit -- your guide will have a first aid kit also but some basic items for blisters, upset stomach/nausea/diarrhea and headache is a good idea
  • Hand Sanitizer
  • Toilet Paper -- some will be brought along but best to bring an extra roll
  • Wet Wipes (recommended)
  • Snacks, light-weight, high calorie, high energy (optional but can be a big help on summit day) -- these are not available locally
  • Electrolytes, powder or tablets (optional)
  • Camera/phone (optional) -- there is no charging capabilities on the mountain unless you bring a solar charger. Extra batteries/memory card are a good idea.

Documents

You will not take these on the mountain

  • Passport
  • Visa (available at JRO Airport upon arrival)
  • Immunization Papers --no immunization is needed unless you are coming from a Yellow Fever risk area.
  • Insurance Documents
  • Emergency contacts

Equipment Provided by Gladys Adventure:

  • sleeping tents (for clients and staff)
  • mess tent
  • cooking tent
  • sleeping mattress (for clients and staff)
  • folding table
  • folding chairs
  • cooking utensils
  • dining utensils
  • cooking fuel
  • food
  • water purification tablets
  • emergency oxygen cylinder(s)
  • portable stretcher
  • first aid kit
  • walkie talkie to communicate with Gladys Adventure office (we have our own private channel for this)

Meals on the Mountain

A climb requires a lot of energy and maximum performance. Meals play a very important role during your trek...

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Meals on the Mountain

While on the mountain, eating a good diet is essential for a successful climb. The food must be high energy, plentiful, appealing and easy to digest. These are important components since a great amount of energy is required. The most common symptoms of altitude sickness are nausea and loss of appetite. Food that will not disturb the stomach further is essential and since climbers at times have to force themselves to eat. The food must be appealing.

A typical breakfast may have combinations of the following:
Porridge, breads/chapati, plantains, pancakes, eggs, sausage, hot chocolate/ tea/ coffee, fruit
Lunches and dinners:
Pasta, rice, plantains, potatoes, vegetables, meat, bread, soup/stew, fruit, popcorn, peanuts

Our cooks can accommodate special diets such as vegetarian/vegan, food allergies, gluten free, etc. We welcome special requests (before we are on the mountain please).

There is no food preservation method on the mountain (this gets less important as the temperature gets colder) but we resupply the food part way through the climb to insure freshness.

Excerpts from our Tripadvisor reviews:

  • "Bosco [guide] ... knew how keep us on track, motivated, healthy, hydrated, well nourished and safe. The food on the trip was great. We had 4 people on gluten free diets and they were able to accommodate us.” -- February 2018
  • “... Moreover food was excellent when other climbers (with other companies) were complaining their amount of food. “ -- February 2018
  • “...Food was outstanding and plentiful -- it was much better than some friends received in climbs they did in the past with other companies. “ -- October 2017
  • “...Faustine, the head chef, made incredible meals on the mountain. We ate way better there than we do back home. “ --July 2017
  • “...The food also exceeded our expectations. Hot soup with every meal, and fresh fruit each day. The crew even sent up our dining tent ahead of us a couple of the days and we had hot lunches. It was things like this that really blew us away. “ --July 2017
  • “...Great food and thoughtful menu that took into account changing preferences at altitude, which really helped us get down calories even at high altitude when appetite is usually suppressed.” --July 2017
  • “...the food is great (to be completely honest every girl on the trip was secretly hoping to maybe lose a kilo or 2, but it just did not happen…the food was way too tasty and Prosper, our guide, was closely monitoring the calorie intake to make sure we have enough energy for the summit day (summit night actually) …my compliments to the chef.” --February 2017
  • “...The food we had on the trail was the best food we had over our month in Africa. It was great and when you factor in it was cooked between 4,000 and 15,000 feet it was incredible.”--January 2017
  • “...Muita who was our waiter who made sure we ate as much as humanly possible ...Throughout our 8 days we were cared for, fed, and sheltered by this great group and it only got better with each day! “ --January 2017
  • “...The meals were also amazing. I had no idea we would be eating so well on this hike.” -- January 2017
  • “... We had the best food on the mountains, fresh and hot, served as per our food preferences.” --December 2016
  • “... And the food from Peter the cook was restaurant quality, in my opinion; I ate chicken, eggs, and many delicious soups.” --December 2016
  • “...They emphasized the importance of drinking enough water and eating enough, which was not difficult at all, because the meals our chef Mariki prepared were delicious. He always made sure that I got a vegetarian meal whilst my husband and our travel companion were also served meat.” -- October 2016
  • “...The food was fantastic (compliments to the chef!) People say that your appetite suffers at altitude but I never would have known that with such delicious food on offer for every meal. I ate so much! “ -- October 2016

Mountain Safety

Trekking above 5,000m cannot be taken lightly. No matter your fitness level adaquate precautions must be taken ...

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Mountain Safety

Mt Kilimanjaro is the highest mountain that can be climbed without technical skills or equipment. So in mountaineering it is referred to as a "walk up mountain". But that does not mean that it is not difficult or should be taken lightly. It is because it is a "walk up mountain" that provides the challenge. At 5,895m (19,341 ft) elevation at the summit there is less than 50% of the oxygen available at sea level. Adjusting to the altitude is the challenge because it is possible to ascend faster than your body can adjust. Technical climbs progress far more slowly than walking, so the body has more time to adjust. This makes Mt Kilimanjaro more dangerous in regard to altitude related problems. It is important to go only with a well trained guide and with proper health monitoring of each person. Gladys Adventure guides will monitor your vital measurments including respiration, pulse, blood oxygen saturation, blood pressure, body temperature and blood sugar to make sure that you are fit. They are trained to pay attention to your respiration and just by engaging in a conversation with you along the way they are monitoring your condition. It is imperative that you are honest and open with your guide about your health. Before the trek, we need to know of any health conditions and medications that you are taking. Chances are very great, that your honesty will not disqualify you from climbing, but the guide will be giving special attention to any potential health threat. Gladys Adventure has a 98% rate of success. We are not striving for everyone to summit. We are striving for 100% safety with the right number to summit.

Diamox---good idea? Approximately 75% of climbers will display symptoms of Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS). Symptoms include severe headache, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, loss of appitite, loss of reasoning, confusion and irratability. Diamox is a drug that causes an increase in respiration thereby increasing your body's ability to acclimatize. It is very difficult to predict a person's ability to handle high altitude. There have been world class athletes that have had to abandon their climb by the 3rd day while some who are far less fit or older have succeeded (88 years old is the current Kilimanjaro age record). There is no good data for comparing whether Diamox has made a difference for a specific person. If you do choose to use Diamox, it is best to purchase it when you arrive in Moshi. It is readily available at pharmacies in the correct dosage and will most certainly be less expensive here. Start taking Diamox before the trek so we can monitor any side effects so the effects of the drug can be distinguished from effects from the altitude. Before the trek, your guide can answer your specific questions.

First Aid Kit -- We will always have a well stocked first aid kit on hand. We suggest that you may bring a few simple items for blisters, sunburn, insect bites, stomach upset, diarrhea and headache.

Stretcher -- Mt Kilimanjaro National Park has some stretchers available scattered along the mountain. They are metal frames with a single motorcycle wheel and suspension mounted under the center of the metal frame. Unfortunately, the ride down is very rough. Rough enough to cause injuries since it is not uncommon for the stretcher to tip over or to throw the disabled climber off unless they are securely strapped in. The park has recognised that these are terrible and are in the process of eliminating them. Instead they will invest in making landing sites for helicopter rescue (see our evacuation insurance article). Gladys Avdenture has portable stretchers for their climbs. Rather than rolling these over the rough terrain like the park stretchers, we use porters to carry the disabled climber off the mountain or to an altitude where they can walk under their own strength.

Oxygen -- All Gladys Adventure climbs will have emergency oxygen available. We reserve the use of the oxygen for emergencies. Our guides are very well experienced to know how and when to allocate the use of the oxygen. Oxygen cylinders are a very important item but are one of the items often left out by companies looking to cut costs, especially if they are using guides that are not porperly trained in administering the oxygen properly anyway.

Gamow Bag -- A gamow bag is an portable compression chamber designed for high altitudes as treatment if a trekker suffers from severe AMS. This can be a lifesaver where the recommended treatment of quickly descending is not possible. On some mountains this is a very important piece of equipment. On some mountains getting a person to a lower altitude can take days. But as we mentioned, being a "walk up" mountain means that it is a problem that people can ascend faster than their body can acclimatize. But this also means that a person can descend quickly with the aid of porters and supervised by a guide. Descending quickly is the preferred treatment of AMS. Gamow bags are inflated with a foot pump. They are also designed intentionally not to be air-tight. So descending with a gamow bag requires frequent stops to reinflate the bag. We do not include a gamow bag as standard equipment but have gamow bags available as an optional add on for any climb ($300 fee) but do not recommend it.

Doctor Accompanied Treks -- We can arrange any climb to be accompanied by a doctor from Kiliamnajro SAR High Altitude Emergency Clinic in Moshi. The doctor will be monitoring your health and will be available to handle health issues of any sort. The price for this service is $2,750 for a group of up to 10 climbers. Talk to us about prices for groups larger than 10 climbers.

Local Facilities -- Kilimanjaro SAR (Search and Rescue) has recently opened Africa's first High Altitude Emergency Clinic. The clinic is based at St Joesph's Hospital in Moshi ( Daily News 15 March, 2018).

Our Guides -- Last but certainly not least is the experience and expertice of our mountain guides. It is easy for a company to say whatever they like. But here are what our clients have reported about Gladys Adventure climb safety on Trip Advisor reviews:

  • ...we had a meeting with our guide the afternoon before we took off to make sure we had everything we would need on the hike and that we weren’t bringing too much with us up the mountain. At once, I felt at ease around our guides. They were very friendly and had years and years of experience on the mountain. Our main guide had been climbing the mountain for nearly 25 years and our assistant guide had also been climbing for over a decade. Between them I was convinced that we had the experience necessary to make a SAFE and successful trip up the mountain. One thing Gladys has done a great job of is attracting the best talent for guides and staff for their treks. Everywhere on the mountain, other guides were coming to our guide to say hi and sometimes ask for advice when they needed help. It was very apparent that our guide was one of the most respected people on the mountain and that a lot of people looked up to him. You got that impression everywhere you went; when people understood you were with Gladys, they knew you were in good hands and had a better chance than most at making it to the top. Our guide took our vitals every morning and evening as we went along the trek and watched us very closely for signs of altitude sickness…. I was anxious about hiking at elevations so high and all of that anxiety was alleviated within the first day of noticing how much experience and competence Gladys group had. We also had supplemental oxygen and other supplies in case of emergency.
    Reviewed March 2018
  • ...our guide (Job) was exceptional, he was trained in mountain rescue so we immediately felt super safe. Every evening he would do briefings about the next day. He made sure everyone felt good during the day. He was also very reassuring whenever one on us was anxious.
    Reviewed February 2018
  • ...the head Glady’s guide, Bosco was amazing. Not just capable and knowledgeable, but fantastic at managing the whole trip including his assistants (Ron, Francis, Julius, Sinai and Alkadi) the porters, and most importantly us! He knew how keep us on track, motivated, healthy, hydrated, well nourished and safe. The food on the trip was great. We had 4 people on gluten free diets and they were able to accommodate us. They monitored everyone's medical / health conditions throughout.
    Reviewed February 2018
  • ...The trek itself was the most difficult challenge I have ever done in my life. I had bad altitude sickness for most of days 3, 4 and 5. The guides, Simon and Ignas, looked after me really well during my altitude sickness. They were both extremely well experienced on the mountain and never pushed us to go faster than our pace. They made sure I was doing alright during the climbing and at the camps to recover well. They had lots of good advice about the altitude sickness, provided medicine when necessary and especially helped keep our spirits up during the toughest parts of the climb, as their awesome encouragement kept us going. I highly recommend Gladys Adventure for climbing Mt Kilimanjaro. For sure we would not have made it without our amazing guides and the whole team behind everything.
    Reviewed February 2018
  • ...Ayubu was absolutely amazing, from the beginning right through to the end. We had health checks every morning and spent the days climbing with him asking him lots of questions about his extensive experience and mountaineering knowledge. We felt so safe with his leadership….When altitude sickness and tiredness kicked in, they sang to us to keep up our spirits. Ayubu prepared us every day for what was ahead of us mentally and physically and on summit night, we both made it to the top as a direct result of amazing support from our guides and porters.
    Reviewed November 2017
  • Our guide, Bosco, was an outstanding mountaineer. He had extensive mountain emergency training and was proactive in checking our heart rate, lungs, etc. each day. He actually helped some clients of other guides who were struggling with altitude sickness. I was impressed that he took time to do this; we saw one young woman summit, after being assisted by our guide -- her own guide didn't seem to know what to do. We heard similar stories from two references who each used other Gladys guides.
    Reviewed October 01, 2017
  • Our guides Prosper, Juma, and Cash were very knowledgeable and took excellent care of us. They were the only guides on the mountain with emergency oxygen and actually had to go to the aid of a climber in need, when their guide did not have the proper emergency supplies. We felt very safe at all times.
    Reviewed September 20, 2017
  • Our head guide Prosper did daily health checks on us and once at higher elevations really kept a close eye on us. One of our crew (and ER nurse) required O2 on summit day and this was handled with great care and professionalism. I'm an ICU nurse and can say these guides had plenty of experience with AMS. They knew exactly what to watch for and always erred on the safe side.
    Reviewed July 2017
  • Strong focus on safety, with emergency oxygen and evacuation insurance included and daily medical checks for everyone.
    Reviewed July 2017
  • The day before the trek we met our amazing chief guide, Prosper, who patiently went through everything with us and ensured that we all felt prepared. Throughout the entire trek, I could tell that our health and safety was number one to our guides, as they took our medical checks and any new symptoms of altitude sickness very seriously.
    Reviewed February 2017
  • From my very first contact with Gladys Adventures (who was recommended by friends also from New Zealand) they were very responsive and made me feel very relaxed and confident in their abilities and service. Casper was our lead guide who was brilliant, medical checks twice daily and he took the time to make sure all 5 of us were happy and comfortable at all times.
    Reviewed January 2017
  • Gladys do a health check every morning (pulse, oxygen saturations and self-assessment of headache/nausea/vomiting etc) and we always felt well looked after. Safe, positive and encouraging.
    Reviewed January 2017
  • Caspar ensured that our safety was #1 by regularly taking our vital signs (blood pressure, heart rate, oxygen saturation, temperature, and listened to our lungs) at least once a day as well as making sure we weren't having any side effects from the altitude such as nausea or headache. Medications and oxygen were readily available if needed.
    Reviewed January 2017

Training for your trek

Trekking above 5,000m cannot be taken lightly. No matter your fitness level adaquate precautions must be taken ...

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Training for your Trek

There will be several kilometers of walking every day for the duration of your trek. The longest day will be 17km, but 11km of that is downhill. Of course if you have difficulty achieving this on a fairly flat terrain at low altitude, it certainly will not be easier at an incline at high altitude. You will need your joints in good condition and a level of fitness to trek this distance while carrying 3L of water and layers of clothes in a day pack. But this can be done by a great many people who are in moderate shape. The current record for oldest to summit Kilimanjaro is 88 year old. The youngest is 7 years old. We suggest that for the months preceding the trek that you walk whenever you get the chance. On the mountain, you will be walking very slowly. VERY slowly. The better shape that you are in and the more your joints are used to walking, the more enjoyable the trip will be.

The biggest obstacle is not the physical conditioning but how the body adjusts to the altitude. There have been world class athletes who have had to abandon their climb by the third day due to problems adjusting to the altitude. There is only one way to train for this and that is to find some elevation to do some hiking. If you are not located in a place where there is much elevation, you can at least arrive in Moshi an day or two early. The elevation of Moshi is only 900m (2,952 ft) but this is enough if coming from sea level. We offer a half day culture day trip to a village just outside of the national park boundaries that is useful for acclimatization and a fun experience (see coffee/waterfalls tour on this page). We also offer a Mt Kilimanjaro day trip, geared mostly for people who do not have the time for a climb but want a little taste of what a Kilimanjaro climb is like. It can also serve as an acclimatization hike. See the article Kilimanjaro Day Hike on this page. There is also the option of climbing the nearby Mt Meru first (4,565m /14,980 ft). This is a 4 days climb and a great climb in its own right. We offer this climb and will add a page with details soon. On the mountain, many people choose to take Diamox to aid in acclimatization. See our mountain safety article on the trekking page for more about this.

Travel/Medical Insurance and Evacuation Insurance

For all Mt Kilimanjaro treks we require each client to have basic medical coverage and also mountain emergency evacuation coverage...

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Travel/Medical Insurance and Evacuation Insurance

For Mt Kilimanjaro climbs we require medical insurance coverage and emergency evacuation insurance. You must be sure that this covers non technical trekking up to 6,000m. We also require emergency evacuation insurance in case you need to be airlifted off the mountain. This may be included in the policy already or you may have to purchase this as an add on.

Kilimanjaro SAR (Search and Rescue) is a Moshi based company which started operation in 2018 offering helicopter rescue. The helicopters are fitted with emergency room equipment and fly with a doctor and an emergency room nurse. They are based at Moshi airport (small regional airport) and promise to be in the air 5 minutes after receiving an emergency call. The cost of an evacuation flight back to Moshi airport is approximately $5,000 USD. Of this, approximately half this cost is for the actual flight. The other half is for the medical staff, equipment and treatment on the mountain and during the flight. If you choose, you can assume the risk of emergency evacuation yourself by signing a waiver before the climb. If emergency evacuation is required, you will be financially responsible for the rescue flight once you are healthy.

Through experience, we find World Nomads to be a good provider (www.worldnomads.com) EXCEPT...if you are from the U.S. there is a problem with World Nomads for U.S. residents where they will require you to pay for the evacuation then reimburse you. Instead you should consider using Ripcord Rescue Travel Insurance (ripcordrescuetravelinsurance.com). This feedback was sent to us from Kilimanjaro SAR based on their experience. Other companies that our clients commonly use include AIG, Priceline, I-Trek, Columbus Direct, Virgin and Simply Travel Insurance.

Q: Doesn't Kilimanjaro National Park already charge a rescue fee? Doesn’t this provide coverage?
A: There is a mandatory fee of $20/climber. This previously went to maintenance of one wheeled rescue stretchers, not towards evacuation costs. The one wheeled stretcher is a very rough ride down the mountain, often adding injuries. They are in the process of discontinuing the maintenance of these. Instead, now with Kilimanjaro SAR in operation, the fee will go to establish and maintain landing sites for the helicopter.

Q: If I cannot summit will I always be airlifted off the mountain?
A: No, this is always a last resort. The vast majority of altitude related sickness is alleviated simply by descending. If the person is able to walk, they will be brought down under the guidance of an assistant guide (or head guide) and porters. If unable to walk, we provide a portable stretcher (carried - no wheels) to carry the person down the mountain. Only under severe circumstances will a helicopter rescue be called.

Kilimanjaro SAR has a few helicpoters available. For healthy clients who have reached the summit but do not care to walk down the mountain, the company offers what they term a Hero Flight where they will fly you down the mountain. The price for this is approximately $2,500 and is not covered by any insurance plan. Contact us if you are interested in this option. They also offer helicopter sightseeing tours of Mt Kilimanjaro.

Coffee Tour/Waterfalls Hike

If you are arriving a day early in Moshi we suggest this culture/acclimatization half day tour...

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Coffee Tour/Waterfalls Hike

We offer a very popular half day cultural/ acclimatization tour. This tour visits a small village just outside of Kilimanjaro National Park boundary. We will tour a small coffee farm and you will learn from a local guide about the cultivation and processing of coffee. You will also learn about the history and customs of the local Chagga tribe. There will be hiking at a waterfalls and even a chance for a swim if you like. The local women will prepare a lunch consisting of traditional Chagga foods. Included in this tour is private transportation, local fees and taxes, English speaking guide, lunch and drinking water. Good shoes for hiking are needed since to get to the waterfalls involves some steep terrain. Athletic shoes are ok, sandals are not. There will be a chance for a short swim so a swimsuit underneath your clothes and a towel would be good items to bring. This trip offers some exercise after your long flight but not so much as to tire you out for the climb.

Prices (quoted in USD) 1 person participating: $120, 2 people: $81/person, 3 people: $69/person, 4+ people: $50/person

Some excerpts from our Tripadvisor Reviews about it...
“........the tour itself was way more than I expected. The coffee part was great (Emanuel went through the process for preparing the beans, and we drank the coffee that). Emanuel we made), and it was followed by a walk to a waterfall (which was honestly dream-like, seeing the water cascade down and the swifts flying around described the history of his area (coffee-growing during colonial times and the development of irrigation from the waterfall) and showed us many interesting plants and animals (chameleons on trees, the nice smell of lime and eucalyptus leaves, a rough leaf used as sandpaper, and, of course, coffee berries [sweet and delicious!]).”
“...We did a day trip to the Matharuni village with a coffee plantation tour and a hike to the waterfall. This was our acclimatisation day, which seemed very helpful and a lot of fun. “

Mt Kilimanjaro Day Trip

Marangu route allows day hikes for a little taste of what a Mt Kilimanjaro climb is like or for acclimatization...

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Mt Kilimanjaro Day Trip

We would pick you up in the morning and drive you to Marangu gate. From there you would walk through the rain-forest to Mandara Hut where you will stop to enjoy lunch. From there you can continue to Maundi Crater to enjoy the view before returning back to the Marangu gate where our vehicle will be waiting to return you back to Moshi. Included is private transportation to and from the mountain, all park entry fees and taxes, box lunch and drinking water and guide salary. Not included is guide tip.

Prices: (quoted in USD)
1 person participating: $220, 2 people: $180/person, 3 people: $172/person, 4 people: $166/person, 5+ people: $150/person

Gladys Adventure

Trekking, Safaris, Clothing & Equipment Hire

P.O. Box 1420
Moshi, Kilimanjaro Region, Tanzania

info@gladysadventure.com

+255 2727 50332
+255 787 111 881

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